Brian Ashby

“Our Charitable Trust has always been a family enterprise, as we are all deeply passionate about the individuals and groups that we’ve been able to help over the years.”

Linking local donors with local needs

The Foundation’s ability to tailor the management of the fund to suit our requirements was a key factor when deciding to transfer Trusteeship. We were able to continue our involvement, by establishing a family panel that continues to meet four times a year to consider applications for funding. We make our decisions in the full knowledge that all applications meet the original charitable objectives of the fund and have been comprehensively assessed by the Foundation’s experienced grantmaking staff.

To find out more, please contact Rachael on 01773 514851 or at rachael@foundationderbyshire.org

Support for the community

Swanwick Luncheon ClubSwanwick Luncheon Club

Swanwick Luncheon Club provides luncheon and fellowship for elderly members of the community. It has a strong social function which reduces isolation. Members meet for coffee and enjoy a social time together, followed by a two course cooked meal.

The grant enabled them to purchase folding tables. These tables will also be used by any other group wishing to use them at the Church.

Macular Disease SocietyMacular Disease Society

The Macular Disease Society Group, Derby is a peer support group which offers advice and information for people that have sight loss cause by Macular degeneration. Being diagnosed can be emotionally very challenging as well as having to cope with practical changes required to a person’s daily lifestyle.

The grant from the Ashby Fund was to cover some basic running costs for the group including rent, speakers and a summer social outing.

Tideswell Male ChoirTideswell Male Choir

Tideswell Male Voice Choir was formed in 1956. Its aim is to provide entertainment and appreciation of choral music by public performance, often raising money for charity.

The grant awarded from the Ashby Fund was to fund a contribution towards the ‘Come and Sing Project’. The aim of this project was to introduce men to singing in a performance without the daunting experience of joining an established choir. As a result of the project at least 30 new members were recruited.